Iconic Hot Rods

Hot rods have been famous for quite some time now. People love them for the vintage feel; the idea of transforming its insides and in that way combing the old and the powerful is exciting for many. Some have even gone back to the roots and practice hot rodding as a lifestyle, meaning constantly working on the old cars and participating in various events. This all comes down to the fact that hot rods are indeed quite popular, thus, it is worth looking back and giving credit to The Hot Rods – ’32 Ford McMullen Roadster, Bob McGee’s 1932 Ford Roadster as well as a few other cars that have made their imprint into the history of hot rods.

’32 Ford McMullen Roadster

Tom McMullen’s baby is often accredited the honors of the most iconic hot rod that created all the hype. It can be seen in movies, on the covers of numerous magazines, in TV shows as well as on album covers. He put in countless hours of work into that beauty, installing parts such as 352ci V8 powerplant, GMC 4:71 supercharger and two four-barrel carburetors. McMullen set numerous speed records in street roadsters, such as El Mirage Dry Lake and the Bonneville Salt Flats, and every time ’32 Ford Roadster was his key to success. For now, Tom McMullen’s original ’32 Roadster is valued at an impressive $750,000 – $1,000,000.

Bob McGee’s 1932 Ford Roadster
Bob McGee’s 1932 Ford Roadster

Bob McGee’s 1932 Ford Roadster

This one has also shaped the way hot rodding has evolved in both its technical and stylistic aspects. Bob McGee built his famous ’32 Ford Roadster in 1947, but even prior to that he was not a stranger in the world of hot rods. This hot rod featured numerous innovations in both its mechanical and outer design aspects. Fun fact – unlike most hot rods of its time, this beauty had a full interior, including leather upholstery done by Summers and a custom dash fabricated by Clayton.

’32 Roadster – Doane Spencer
’32 Roadster – Doane Spencer

’32 Roadster – Doane Spencer

This hot rod is the most influential actor in the custom fabrication department. Spencer purchased it in 1944 from his high school buddy for as little as 500$. It had received some modifications by that time, but most of the work was still done and is attributed to Spencer. At some point in time the car was Spencer’s everyday means of transportation, but it competed in numerous races, such as Panamerica road race or the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. It was sold and modified after that, and now sits in Bruce Meyer’s hot rod collection.

Dick Flint 1929 Ford Roadster

This is the mainstream media of hot rods. In fact, it started off as three different cars. It wasn’t until Flint came up with the idea to create the ultimate street/lake roadster that the creation of this beauty began. The bodies of the three roadsters were dismantled and when the final body was ready, it was subjected to Flint’s custom chassis, and received numerous fixtures to turn it into a complete car.

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